Leaves

Blog

Blog

"Secret to Great Cities and Towns" revealed for Cleveland

Marc Lefkowitz  |  04/17/14 @ 11:45am  |  Posted in Vibrant cities

In our last post, we wrote about cities like Cleveland that “hide” their good points when they don’t make their proximity known. We also wrote recently about the immense value to cities that plant street trees. Streets with tree canopies and cities with a well-placed wayfinding system will reveal Cleveland's “secrets,” encourage discovery on foot, and keep nature close to...

Return to a golden age<br />The Ponte Vecchio, Florence is a gathering spot the has inspired the likes of East Fourth Street in Cleveland. 

All images from the book, Street Design: The Secret to Great Cities and Towns, Dover and Massengale, 2014.Go organic<br />Instead of pruning it back, the lean in tree defines this small street in Oxford, England. 

Image from the book, Street Design: The Secret to Great Cities and Towns, Dover and Massengale, 2014.Streets alive<br />The live oaks in Savannah, Georgia grow into this street providing shade and natural calming devices. It would be illegal by today's standards.

Image from the book, Street Design: The Secret to Great Cities and Towns, Dover and Massengale, 2014.Only a wonk could love<br />A green street project in Brooklyn, NY fails the Dover and Massengale placemaking test. They say its designed to speed cars to the suburbs.A road longing<br />Dover proposed converting this suburban street, Johnny Dodds Boulevard in South Carolina, from an auto sewer to an economic powerhouse (view existing)Bring the people back<br />Proposed conversion of Johnny Dodds Boulevard in South Carolina into a multiway boulevard Going for broke<br />The city decided on the conventional approach, to widen Johnny Dodds Boulevard in South Carolina, despite the economics favoring the multiway boulevard.Great Cleveland streets<br />Hessler in University Circle has many of the elements of a great street.Little village<br />Little Italy in Cleveland is a comfortable place for a stroll despite the car traffic.Variety is the spice<br />Interesting storefronts and facades close to the street in this case Coventry Road in Cleveland Heights invite strolling.Leafy suburbs<br />Tall trees lend a long and straight street in Cleveland Heights variety and a sense of calm.
Previous
Next

Legible London firm reveals Cleveland's secrets

Marc Lefkowitz  |  04/15/14 @ 10:00am  |  Posted in Biking, Transit, Vibrant cities, Walking

Cleveland and its visitor's bureau are working on a Seamless Cleveland wayfinding system that will connect the city's great destinations by foot, bike, bus, trolley and train.

Making Cleveland legible<br />Images from Seamless Cleveland: A wayfinding master plan<br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
Previous
Next

Fascinating before-and-after photos of treelawns in CLE reveal the awesome nature of cities

Marc Lefkowitz  |  04/11/14 @ 1:00pm  |  Posted in Home landscaping, Connecting to nature, Plants & animals

During a recent trip to Tijuana, Mexico landscape designer, Armando Ramos, who is fighting for the creation of a central park within the borders of his city of 1.7 million inhabitants, made a connection between nature and math. The World Health Organization has calculated that we all need to breath 360 liters of oxygen a day, he said, adding that it...

Honeylocusts on Morton<br />This tree canopy on Morton in Cleveland grew in a mere 40 years.Lindens on South Woodland<br />Images from the same spot in 1970 on the left and 2007 on the right show the impact trees can have on our feeling of a place. 

From Street Tree Evaluation Project: Forty Years of Street Tree Evaluation in Five Communities.Faasens Black Norway Maple on Arlis<br />The tree canopy on Arlis in Cleveland has the visual effect of making the road seem narrower.Japanese Scholartrees on W. 33rd Street<br />None of the original trees from the 1950s survived. Many were aggressively pruned below the power lines.Callery pears on Birchwold<br />The variation between losing a brick-lined street for asphalt is interesting. The pear trees didn't survive particularly well.Corktrees on College<br />College Street in Wooster shows how mature canopy trees dramatically change our perception of place.Norway maples on W. 58th Street<br />Many Cleveland streets suffered the loss of tree lawn trees over the last 40 yearsHawthornes on Heinritz<br />Heinritz in Cleveland lost many of its street trees since 1970.Lake in Toledo<br />Ash trees on W. 182nd Street<br />Miracle on W.182nd Street in Cleveland. The survival of Velvet Ash trees.
Previous
Next

Ten big projects that are bringing bikes and transit back to cities

Marc Lefkowitz  |  04/10/14 @ 11:00am  |  Posted in Transportation choices

It seems like every city in the U.S. has a plan or a conversation going about building density and walkability back into their downtowns. In 2009, the federal government acknowledged the historic shift back to cities, America's reduction in driving and the need to build vibrant places that are less car dependent with a new, billion dollar sustainable transportation fund.

Hot in Pittsburgh<br />Pittsburgh is converting its Hot Metal Bridge to a bike and pedestrian facility leading to a new park at a former steel mill.

Image: wikimapia.orgBring the center back<br />Oklahoma City will renovate this Amtrak station as an inter-modal transit facility and introduce new bus and local transit service.From pass through to walkable<br />The Town of Olean, New York is calming traffic and introducing walk and bike facilities to its main street.

Image: Walkable OleanAll aboard<br />Cincinnati is building a streetcar that will link downtown, Over The Rhine neighborhood and at the river front.

Image: UrbanCincyTransit goes Uptown<br />Greater Cleveland RTA is building a Rapid station in Little Italy.

Image: GCRTABeach diet<br />Ft. Myers Beach, Florida introduced bike lanes without widening an existing road.

Image: Streetsblog
Previous
Next

"Parking craters" are costing cities like Cleveland millions, study finds

Marc Lefkowitz  |  04/09/14 @ 9:00am  |  Posted in Vibrant cities

Every March, fans from sustainable transportation web site, Streetsblog, dutifully fill in their brackets for a tournament they call “Parking Madness.” Participants send in their pictures of enormous parking lots that look at home at a suburban big box center. Except they come from places like St. Louis, Tulsa (the 2013 champion), El Paso, Buffalo, and Cleveland.

<br />

Filter by RSS

Social media feed

  • "Secret to Great Cities and Towns" revealed for Cleveland: In our last post, we wrote about cities like Clevel... http://t.co/Ah0gPaEh5b
    6 days ago via Twitter
  • Legible London firm reveals Cleveland's secrets: Cleveland and its visitor's bureau are working on a Seamless ... http://t.co/LDgNYj9w1F
    8 days ago via Twitter
  • Fascinating before-and-after photos of treelawns in CLE reveal the awesome nature of cities: During a recent t... http://t.co/P8hpi5xrR5
    12 days ago via Twitter
Help us create the future!

Help us create the future! >

Your donation helps GCBL bring fresh ideas to Northeast Ohio

Where's the best urban stroll?

Where's the best urban stroll? >

From Shaker to Hudson, here's our list of favorite places to stroll

Buildings of the future

Buildings of the future >

See videos from the Museum's amazing Building with Nature Symposium