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Legible London firm reveals Cleveland's secrets

Marc Lefkowitz  |  04/15/14 @ 10:00am  |  Posted in Biking, Transit, Vibrant cities, Walking

Cleveland and its visitor's bureau are working on a Seamless Cleveland wayfinding system that will connect the city's great destinations by foot, bike, bus, trolley and train.

Making Cleveland legible<br />Images from Seamless Cleveland: A wayfinding master plan<br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
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Fascinating before-and-after photos of treelawns in CLE reveal the awesome nature of cities

Marc Lefkowitz  |  04/11/14 @ 1:00pm  |  Posted in Home landscaping, Connecting to nature, Plants & animals

During a recent trip to Tijuana, Mexico landscape designer, Armando Ramos, who is fighting for the creation of a central park within the borders of his city of 1.7 million inhabitants, made a connection between nature and math. The World Health Organization has calculated that we all need to breath 360 liters of oxygen a day, he said, adding that it...

Honeylocusts on Morton<br />This tree canopy on Morton in Cleveland grew in a mere 40 years.Lindens on South Woodland<br />Images from the same spot in 1970 on the left and 2007 on the right show the impact trees can have on our feeling of a place. 

From Street Tree Evaluation Project: Forty Years of Street Tree Evaluation in Five Communities.Faasens Black Norway Maple on Arlis<br />The tree canopy on Arlis in Cleveland has the visual effect of making the road seem narrower.Japanese Scholartrees on W. 33rd Street<br />None of the original trees from the 1950s survived. Many were aggressively pruned below the power lines.Callery pears on Birchwold<br />The variation between losing a brick-lined street for asphalt is interesting. The pear trees didn't survive particularly well.Corktrees on College<br />College Street in Wooster shows how mature canopy trees dramatically change our perception of place.Norway maples on W. 58th Street<br />Many Cleveland streets suffered the loss of tree lawn trees over the last 40 yearsHawthornes on Heinritz<br />Heinritz in Cleveland lost many of its street trees since 1970.Lake in Toledo<br />Ash trees on W. 182nd Street<br />Miracle on W.182nd Street in Cleveland. The survival of Velvet Ash trees.
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Ten big projects that are bringing bikes and transit back to cities

Marc Lefkowitz  |  04/10/14 @ 11:00am  |  Posted in Transportation choices

It seems like every city in the U.S. has a plan or a conversation going about building density and walkability back into their downtowns. In 2009, the federal government acknowledged the historic shift back to cities, America's reduction in driving and the need to build vibrant places that are less car dependent with a new, billion dollar sustainable transportation fund.

Hot in Pittsburgh<br />Pittsburgh is converting its Hot Metal Bridge to a bike and pedestrian facility leading to a new park at a former steel mill.

Image: wikimapia.orgBring the center back<br />Oklahoma City will renovate this Amtrak station as an inter-modal transit facility and introduce new bus and local transit service.From pass through to walkable<br />The Town of Olean, New York is calming traffic and introducing walk and bike facilities to its main street.

Image: Walkable OleanAll aboard<br />Cincinnati is building a streetcar that will link downtown, Over The Rhine neighborhood and at the river front.

Image: UrbanCincyTransit goes Uptown<br />Greater Cleveland RTA is building a Rapid station in Little Italy.

Image: GCRTABeach diet<br />Ft. Myers Beach, Florida introduced bike lanes without widening an existing road.

Image: Streetsblog
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"Parking craters" are costing cities like Cleveland millions, study finds

Marc Lefkowitz  |  04/09/14 @ 9:00am  |  Posted in Vibrant cities

Every March, fans from sustainable transportation web site, Streetsblog, dutifully fill in their brackets for a tournament they call “Parking Madness.” Participants send in their pictures of enormous parking lots that look at home at a suburban big box center. Except they come from places like St. Louis, Tulsa (the 2013 champion), El Paso, Buffalo, and Cleveland.

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Who is trying to bring down Ohio's Renewable Energy law?

Marc Lefkowitz  |  04/08/14 @ 11:00am  |  Posted in Clean energy

Mainstream media coverage of Ohio’s Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard (RPS)—which is again under attack in the state’s General Assembly—has missed important facts about who stands to gain (and lose) from a clean energy policy, says Media Matters for America.

Big push for wind<br />Honda installed two wind turbines capable of generating 10 percent of the power at its Russell's Point, Ohio transmission manufacturing facility.

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